Folk Dancing

Folk Dancing

Serbian dance is an old tradition and a strong element in the Serbian culture. The traditional dances are of social function, bringing the community and families together at various important days such as weddings, Christmas or Easter.

During the time of Ottoman Turkish occupation of the Serbian lands, Serbs have danced usually among the family, at social gatherings of feast days in the evening. They danced to vocal musical themes, including the wedding kolos (oros). The instrumental music for indoor entertainment has become more often at the end of the 19th century. In connection with social gatherings among the Serbs around the churches and monasteries called Sabori during the Slava and Hram (Patron of the monastery) there was a belief that everyone must dance (to instrumental accompaniments) in order to gain and secure good health.

Kolo (Serbian Cyrillic: Коло) is the traditional collective folk dance, where a group of people (usually several dozen, at the very least three) holding each other by the hands or around the waist, dance, ideally in a circle, hence the name. There is almost no movement above the waist. Each region has at least one unique kolo; it is difficult to master and even most experienced dancers cannot master all of them.

The dance is accompanied by instrumental two-beat music with the same name, made most often with an accordion, but also with other instruments: frula (traditional kind of a recorder), tamburica, sargija, zurla, gajde, tapan, or harmonica.